Génesis

Ting-Sung Cheng
First-Year Student, A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning

Medium

Graphite painting

Abstract 

Génesis, the origin of the creation, integrates the hypothesis of the beginning of lives with my imagination. Inspired by the Miller-Urey experiment, I illustrate people’s wild curiosity in uncovering the truth and its contrast with the vastness of the universe; I further redefine the size of common structures and unnerve the relationship between each object.

The main reason why I choose graphite as the medium is simple—I believe the contrast of black and white is stronger and could stimulate the audience to further meditate on the meaning of “truth.” In addition, it enables more space for imagining.

Génesis, the origin of the creation, integrates the hypothesis of the beginning of lives with my imagination. To illustrate people’s wild curiosity in uncovering the truth and its contrast with the vastness of the universe, I redefine the size of common structures and illogically unnerve the relationship between each object.

We seem to take the nature of things for granted, leading us to be somewhat trapped within an established framework. The Miller-Urey experiment simulated an environment in the early Earth and proved the possibility to synthesize organic matter from the inorganics. The experiment, taken place in flasks, capsuled the development for millions of years and demonstrated the temptation of truth. However, what philosophy is hidden behind the truth? I believed each individual’s interpretation could strike a different answer.

Inspired by the experiment, I feature surrealistic juxtaposition and twisted relationships between objects in my design. The process of choosing the background of the experiment is also interesting; I struggle to find a place that is reflective of my ideas. Later I realize the lake, in some ways, is a window between reality and fancy. The lunar phases and the accelerating meteorite implies the continuity of time, and our forever desire for the universal truth. When the perspective shifts from the sky to the ground, a man is gazing at the flask sets. The difference in sizes represents human’s insignificance compared to the unknown in the world. Besides that, it also hints at our endeavors to progress throughout the time, parallel with how Miller and Urey did in the experiment.

The main reason why I choose graphite as the medium is simple—I believe the contrast of black and white is stronger and could stimulate the audience to further meditate on the meaning of “truth.” In addition, it enables more space for imagining.